Juvenile News

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ODP News and Events

Press

Juvenile Life Without Parole: An Overview

 "Most of the approximately 2,500 individuals sentenced as juveniles to life without the possibility of parole now have a chance for release in the wake of recent Supreme Court decisions. The choice to allow teenagers to receive the harshest available sentence is not shared among all states. Sixteen states have banned life sentences without the possibility of parole for juveniles; in a handful of other states, no one is serving the sentence."

Judge wants fresh start for once ‘irredeemable’ girl

"Jennifer was once considered irredeemable. Now I, the same judge who said she would die in prison, believe she deserves an opportunity to demonstrate her change before a proper parole or resentencing entity. She proves that we can never predict who a child will become as an adult and that we are all more than the worst thing that we have ever done."

Report Cites Failure to Act Against Abusers of Juveniles in Detention

"For more than a decade, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics has conducted anonymous surveys of youngsters in custody. Those surveys have produced startling estimates: that some 10 percent of children in detention have reported sexual abuse by either staff or peers, often repeatedly, and often at the hands of female guards who victimize boys."

Addressing trauma in juvenile offenders should be larger focus of rehabilitation, study finds

"For this study, Case Western Reserve researchers reviewed data from 2,200 Midwestern youths with behavioral health issues in the justice system. Many of the youths live in disadvantaged neighborhoods, which are more likely to have higher rates of crime."

Fewer adult and juvenile inmates going to solitary

"A report released Tuesday by the Correctional Institution Inspection Committee, a legislative watchdog agency, showed the overall rate of solitary confinement at the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, the adult prison system, dropped nearly 22 percent from 2011 to 2015."

Dean Strang Interviews Bryan Stevenson, An "Exceptional" Trial Lawyer

"Most trial lawyers engage, daily, with the emotions and vices that underlie human conflict—anger, jealousy, greed, spite. Some do more than engage: They adopt these vices. Bryan Stevenson is the rare exception. He has dedicated his life to healing anger and fear, and bringing light to the darkest corners of our criminal justice system."

The Court is Right: Children are ‘Constitutionally Different.’

"The Supreme Court’s historic ruling, in Montgomery v. Louisiana, held as retroactive its 2012 decision in Miller v. Alabama, which banned mandatory life without parole sentences for children. Montgomery is the fourth decision from our nation’s highest court in just over a decade  establishing that children are 'constitutionally different' from adults,  and that their child status is therefore relevant to  sentencing—thereby making them less deserving of our harshest available punishments."

Navigating the Dual Status Terrain: Tips for Juvenile Defenders

"Despite the nuances of each dual status youth case, there are some reliable statistics that reveal that dual status youth consistently experience disparate treatment while involved with the juvenile justice system and notably poorer outcomes following experience with both systems."

This Boy's Life

"At 16, Taurus Buchanan threw one deadly punch--and was sent away for life. Will the Supreme Court give him, and hundreds like him, a chance at freedom?"

Op: Children should not be shackled -- Ohio Supreme Court right to re-examine rules

"Studies show that when they perceive that the court is treating them fairly, adolescents are more cooperative and gain respect for the law. I meet kids on what may already be the worst day of their lives. Putting them in chains only increases that stress. It makes it difficult for them to concentrate, to confer with their attorneys and to communicate with me. Without the shackles, young people are noticeably better listeners and much more engaged in the process."--Darlene Byrne, Texas Judge and NCJFCJ President